Industrial Filigree by Cal Lane

What artist Cal Lane can do with an old oil drum is just short of miraculous. She transforms ugly, industrial pieces into soft and delicate works of beauty. I never thought I’d want to drape an old steel beam around my shoulders, but Lane makes it seem possible. Her pieces thrive on contradiction and opposition that create balance by contrasting ideas and materials. The results are intricate “Industrial Doilies”. Lane’s current work reflects this period of war, political unrest and oil obsession. Her recent exhibition, “Crude”, consists of a series of flayed oil cans formed into a cross or gothic cathedral floor plan and cut into Christian or Medieval like Icons. Though overtly political, the resulting images seem to merely coexist, reflecting a juxtaposition of God and Oil.  In “Filigree Car Bombing”, Lane focuses on creating images of beauty in the form of a violent situation. “The crushed steel of a car is cut into fine lace creating a drapery of disruption and sadness, a conflict of attraction to beauty and the attraction to a horrific image.”

Work in Progress

Lace Curtain

Work in Progress

Find more of her work HERE and follow her on FACEBOOK.

Unbelievable Sculptures!

I am almost at a loss of words for these detailed sculptures by Li Hongbo, a Beijing based artist, book designer and editor. What appear to be plain porcelain busts and skulls reveal their true design when twisted and pulled like taffy. The sculptures are created by gluing together thousands of layers of honeycomb-like paper and intricately carving desired shapes. Li transforms the paper into two distinct forms, a fully shaped solid piece and captured movement, undefined and surrealistic. The sculptures in motion will amaze. See the video below!

DOMINIK MERSCH GALLERY, Sydney presents: Li Hongbo demonstrating how his paper sculptures work. from Dominik Mersch Gallery on Vimeo.

Lifelike Sculptures by Sam Jinks

These sculptures are so lifelike, I keep expecting them to move. After seeing more, I’m rather glad that they can’t. The Australian visual artist’s sculptures amaze, impress and leave you slightly uncomfortable. He uses silicone, resin and fiberglass to create his hyper-realistic art.

Many people feel that Sam’s work produces a creepy effect by existing in the “uncanny valley.” This is the idea that when human features are close, but not exactly, like natural human beings, it causes a response of aversion or revulsion. For example, the sculpture of a face without eyes or a mouth may fall into this category.  No matter how you feel about his work, it’s truly incredible and worth sharing.

Source: Sam Jinks via Viral Nova