Neo-Expressionist and Surrealist Art by Raul D’Mauries

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Raul D’Mauries is an artist in the Bay Area. His work has been featured across California. A self-taught artist, Raul began painting with oils and acrylics in 2005. Surreal artists such as Salvador Dalí and René Magritte are major influences, but Raul defines his style as “low brow” or pop surrealism. He continues to experiment with different styles and mediums to improve his techniques.

Raul’s art will be featured at 3Dot Art Gallery in Alameda California for the month of October (2017). 3Dot Art Gallery is one of the businesses featured in Alameda’s 2nd Friday Art Walk. Check it out to see what other art events are happening. During the month of October, 3Dot’s neighbor gallery, Studio 23, will present it’s popular UV Blacklight Art Show. If you’re in the Bay Area, don’t miss a fun, free and sensory filled experience at both 3Dot Art Gallery and it’s sister gallery Studio 23!

Pandora's Box

Pandora’s Box, Oil on Panel, 2017

Raul Painting 2017

Raul D’Mauries at Work (2017)

 

Art by Sara Edge

Each wearable art piece is hand-carved in metal (brass, copper, sterling silver), detail etched and hand-painted. I find my passion working with metal, wood
 and glass, which are tied to the earth and composed of natural elements. I specialize in small sculpture art and wearable art, as well as woodworking and paintings. My work reflects a love of ocean life, nature and fantasy. I strongly advocate for protecting the environment and have studied (professionally) ocean health for over 15 years. I am currently based in Oakland, CA and my work has been featured at several galleries and studios across California. I am also 100% self-taught in my art work. 
 TRUE FACT:
 Although I have been diving to over 2800 feet in a submarine… Sadly, I have yet to meet the Kraken or Cthulhu.

See more at: SedgeArt

 

The Fairytale Sculptures of Scott Radke

Scott Radke is a Cleveland-based artist who’s work can be found from London to Los Angeles in major galleries, studios and private art collections. His work and designs have made appearances in such films as Walt Disney’s Academy award winning Alice in Wonderland Directed by Tim Burton. Radke’s sculptures stem from subconscious imagery. He uses mixed media in his puppet-like sculptures and explores a fairy-tale like mixture of animal human hybrids. His work is highly influenced by nature.


See more of Scott’s work HERE and follow him on Facebook or Instagram.

Industrial Filigree by Cal Lane

What artist Cal Lane can do with an old oil drum is just short of miraculous. She transforms ugly, industrial pieces into soft and delicate works of beauty. I never thought I’d want to drape an old steel beam around my shoulders, but Lane makes it seem possible. Her pieces thrive on contradiction and opposition that create balance by contrasting ideas and materials. The results are intricate “Industrial Doilies”. Lane’s current work reflects this period of war, political unrest and oil obsession. Her recent exhibition, “Crude”, consists of a series of flayed oil cans formed into a cross or gothic cathedral floor plan and cut into Christian or Medieval like Icons. Though overtly political, the resulting images seem to merely coexist, reflecting a juxtaposition of God and Oil.  In “Filigree Car Bombing”, Lane focuses on creating images of beauty in the form of a violent situation. “The crushed steel of a car is cut into fine lace creating a drapery of disruption and sadness, a conflict of attraction to beauty and the attraction to a horrific image.”

Work in Progress

Lace Curtain

Work in Progress

Find more of her work HERE and follow her on FACEBOOK.

Sensous Sculpture Garden

Bruno Torf created one of Australia’s’ most beautiful sculpture gardens, a rain forest filled with amazing art work blended with the natural surroundings. Bruno Torfs - Tutt'Art@ Bruno Torfs - Tutt'Art@ (25) Bruno Torfs - Tutt'Art@ (24) Bruno Torfs - Tutt'Art@ (20) Torf was born in South America and  moved to Europe at the age of 15.  An adventurous spirit and a passion for traveling took him on many trips around the world. After spending several years traveling, Bruno and his family moved to Australia. He had formulated  a vision in the sculpture garden and found the perfect place to bring it to life. The location in Maryville, a small Victorian village near Melbourne, offered the ideal location with luscious, sub-alpine forests and large patches of rain forests. In these forests, Bruno created an inspiring and beautiful fantasy world influenced by his travels.

Bruno Torfs - Tutt'Art@ (30) Bruno Torfs - Tutt'Art@ (29) Bruno Torfs - Tutt'Art@ (27) Bruno Torfs - Tutt'Art@ (12) Bruno Torfs - Tutt'Art@ (1)Disaster struck in February 2009 when the Black Saturday bushfires overtook the area. The result was one of Australia’s most devastating wildfires ever recorded. Despite authorities prohibiting locals to enter the town, Bruno was convinced that his artworks were destroyed. Surprisingly, a large number of his sculptures survived the fire, so the artist decided to rebuild his beloved garden.

slides_15 G1113175541 G11416753 after the fire bruno garden 3568832867_8c57bf49f8

Unbelievable Sculptures!

I am almost at a loss of words for these detailed sculptures by Li Hongbo, a Beijing based artist, book designer and editor. What appear to be plain porcelain busts and skulls reveal their true design when twisted and pulled like taffy. The sculptures are created by gluing together thousands of layers of honeycomb-like paper and intricately carving desired shapes. Li transforms the paper into two distinct forms, a fully shaped solid piece and captured movement, undefined and surrealistic. The sculptures in motion will amaze. See the video below!


DOMINIK MERSCH GALLERY, Sydney presents: Li Hongbo demonstrating how his paper sculptures work. from Dominik Mersch Gallery on Vimeo.

Lifelike Sculptures by Sam Jinks

These sculptures are so lifelike, I keep expecting them to move. After seeing more, I’m rather glad that they can’t. The Australian visual artist’s sculptures amaze, impress and leave you slightly uncomfortable. He uses silicone, resin and fiberglass to create his hyper-realistic art.

Many people feel that Sam’s work produces a creepy effect by existing in the “uncanny valley.” This is the idea that when human features are close, but not exactly, like natural human beings, it causes a response of aversion or revulsion. For example, the sculpture of a face without eyes or a mouth may fall into this category.  No matter how you feel about his work, it’s truly incredible and worth sharing.

Source: Sam Jinks via Viral Nova