Art for Assistance

I am raising money for science education. Please buy art to help! Check out the details at www.gofundme.com/artforassistance

The Art of Audrey Kawasaki

Audrey Kawasaki is an Los Angeles, California based artist whose works are contradictions within themselves. Her pieces are both innocent and erotic; attractive yet disturbing. Audrey’s precise technical style is at once influenced by both manga comics and Art Nouveau. Her sharp graphic imagery is combined with the natural grain of the wood panels she paints on, bringing an unexpected warmth to enigmatic subject matter.

The figures she paints are seductive and contain an air of melancholy. They exist in their own sensually esoteric realm, yet at the same time present a sense of accessibility that draws the observer to them. These mysterious young women captivate with the direct stare of seductive eyes.

itwasyou_lj

It Was You
oil, graphite, and ink on wood panel 24″x24″ (2014)

manic_lj

Manic
oil, graphite, and ink on wood panel 20″x36″ (2014)

maybetomorrow_lj

Maybe Tomorrow
oil, graphite, and ink on wood panel 24″x24″ (2014)

herway_lj

Her Way
oil, graphite, and ink on wood panel 18″x30″ (2013)

time_will_tell_sml

Time Will Tell
oil, ink, and graphite on wood 24″x18″ (2013)

youcomefirst_sml

You Come First
oil, acrylic, and graphite on wood panel 16″x16″ (2012)

mizuki_lj

Mizuki
oil, graphite, and ink on wood panel 35″x35″ (2014)

enrapture_lj

Enrapture
oil and graphite on wood panel 24″x24″ (2011)

deeper_lj

Deeper
oil and graphite on wood panel 24″x18″ (2011)

hyakki_yako_lj

“Hyakki Yakou” 百鬼夜行 night parade (inspired by Hyakki Yako scroll)
oil and graphite on wood 25.5″x15.5″ (2009)

here_for_now_sml

Here For Now
graphite and ink on paper 12″x16″ (2013)

For updates on her new work, pieces in progress and more check:
Website
Blog
Facebook
Instagram
Twitter
Tumblr
Continue reading

Poetic Acrylic Paintings by Duy Huynh

Vietnamese born artist Duy Huynh creates poetic acrylic paintings inspired by stories drawn from ancient folklore, comic books, film, and music. He moved to the United States in the early 80s and took refuge in art as he struggled with language barriers and his new environment. Themes of cultural and geographical displacement frequently appear in Huynh’s. His attempts to connect fluid patterns in nature with that of human designs creates a juxtaposition of movement and stillness. You can see more of his original works in his archives.

Eye-catching, Elegant Illustrations by Anna Dittmann

Anna Dittmann is a young illustrator from San Francisco with a talent for creating enigmatic portraits. She has been artistic from a young age, but became serious about her art when she discovered Photoshop at the age of 13. Anna’s love of nature and biology is a recurring theme in her work. Her pieces evoke a sense of mystery through her delicate and ethereal style. She creates soft pieces that emit organic natural elements, mythology and movement.

This is my personal favorite. I am partial to anything octopus!

Ink

Vine

Orb

Mane

Crown

Camouflage

Find more of Anna’s work HERE.

Affecting Art on Vintage Book Pages by Loui Jover

Australian based artist Loui Jover creates works that embody emotions and meaning. His compositions illustrate a range of ideas and feelings, but I am mostly drawn to his melancholic and intellectual pieces. He creates images using ink on vintage book pages resulting in a sense of fragility and an ephemeral quality. Stark black lines, dripping with emotion, are set against intricately printed words on delicate pages. The combination of pages and images are improvised and formed as chance permits. The resulting combinations offer a complex fusion of depth and meaning that feel as if an entire novel is contained in one image. The observer takes away his or her own meaning from the thoughts an feelings provoked by Jover’s pieces.

Holocene

Holocene

Lotus

Lotus

This is just a small representation of Jover’s work. He has an amazing collection. Check more out at these links:  Facebook and pieces for sale at Saatchi Art

A Left-side Bias in Art

Normally I post images of contemporary pieces that I find beautiful or intriguing. However, this article describing research that has found a prominent left-side bias in art is fascinating. I will start paying attention to this much more now. Article link HERE.

Draw My Left! No, No, My Other Left! A Hidden Bias In Art History Revealed

Look at this guy. He is half-smiley, half-frowny. I drew the mouth carefully to make it equal parts sad and happy. But when you look at him — take him in whole — would you say he’s having a good day or a bad day?
Man with smiley/frowny face.

Most people would say: good day. He seems a little more smiley than not.

That’s because, says science writer , when we look at somebody, the left side of that person’s face is more emotionally powerful and “determines the overall emotional tenor.”

So if his left side is happy and his right side is sad, left wins — the whole face feels happy-ish. What is equal is made unequal. It’s as if when I look at you, instead of taking you in with one visual gulp, I’m scanning your face from left to right and the left side feels more dominant.

Why would that be?

Man looking at another man with his right brain dominant.

Well, when you look at someone, your right brain is doing most of the work. That’s the side of your brain that specializes in faces and is extra good at reading emotions.

But — as you probably know — your right brain operates mainly through the left side of your body. So when you look at someone’s face, your right brain pulls in information from the left of your visual field. Which means you will notice more, read more and remember more about the left side of that person’s face. His right side matters less.

When you look at someone's face, your right brain pulls in information from the left of your visual field. Which means you will notice more about the left side of that person's face.

If you were to see a photo of that person later, and cut it in half, you’d think, “Oh, this guy looks more like his left side.” That’s because your brain tricked you to think that way.

In his , The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons, Sam Kean says this habit of “looking left” has profoundly affected the world of art — especially portrait painting.

People who sit for artists, he says, seem to have a sense that the left side of their face is going to pack more emotive power and make a bigger impression than the right side. This is almost certainly not a conscious thought, but if you look systematically at enough paintings, you’ll see a clear, telltale pattern.

In portrait after portrait, you find that subjects, instead of looking dead on at the viewer …

Portrait of a man facing forward, looking dead on at the viewer.

… they will face slightly sideways to give their left side more exposure.

Man turning slightly sideways to give his left side more exposure.

Mona Lisa is a famous example. She (or was it Leonardo?) decided to turn her face ever so slightly, exposing more left cheek.

The Mona Lisa by Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci, at the Louvre museum in Paris.

Jean-Pierre Muller/AFP/Getty Images

How big is the “show-us-your-left” bias? Well, if sitters behaved totally randomly, you’d expect to see the three basic options equally often: 33 percent would face the audience, 33 percent would turn left, 33 percent would turn right.

But when scholars looked, that’s not what they found. of 1,474 portraits painted in Europe from the 16thto the 20th centuries found that roughly 60 percent showed the sitter favoring the left side of the face — men 56 percent of the time, women 68 percent. looked at 50,000 objects from the stone age to the present and found that after the early Greeks, there was a consistent left-profile bias. When it comes to Jesus suffering on the cross, the tilt is dramatic: Jesus’ head is shown facing left of the time.

The “show-us-your-left” bias, Sam writes, “held, no matter whether the artists themselves were left- or right-handed.”

We don’t know if the artists told their models, “I want you to look to the left,” or if the sitters chose this posture to display their more expressive side. “But the bias seems universal,” Sam writes. He points out that when the sitter turns, the left eye moves toward the center of the canvas, like this …

Two faces, one looking dead on and the other looking left.

… which then puts most of the sitter’s face on the left side, where, says Sam, “the face-hungry right hemisphere can study it.”

When Doesn’t This Happen?

There are exceptions, of course. Leonardo da Vinci, who painted Mona Lisa, often went the other way and produced lots of right-facing portraits.

Self-portraits, it seems, often face right. But, Sam says, “Artists tend to paint self-portraits in the mirror, which makes the left half of the face appear on the right side of the canvas. So this ‘exception’ might actually confirm the bias.”

Curiously, Sam found that prominent scientists, at least in their official portraits for the Royal Society in England, usually face right. “Perhaps they simply preferred to seem cooler and less emotional — more the stereotypical rationalist.”

Prominent scientists usually face right.

A skeptic might say this is learned behavior. You go to art school or become an apprentice — the boss turns his subjects to show more left cheek, so you pick up the habit. So that’s what this is: a habit. And maybe a Western habit. Western languages, after all, read left to right. In Arabic, the language (and the faces?) might go the other way.

Sam considered this, but he found “surveys of portraits in Egypt (where texts read right to left) turned up a healthy majority of left-facing portraits as well.”

What about children’s drawings? Kids haven’t been exposed to adult paintings, museum art, cultural cues — they just grab crayons and draw. Do they draw faces looking left?

Do kids draw faces looking left?

They do, says Sam. Most kids — especially the righties — draw people facing left. “Overall culture probably influences the direction of portraits somewhat,” he wrote, “but most artists naturally highlight the left side.”

Astounding Self-Portraits by Eloy Morales

Spanish artist Eloy Morales has created eye-catching self portraits. All is not as it seems with the paint covered faces below. What is so impressive about someone covering his face in paint? Scroll through to the end and find out for yourself.

Morales painstakingly painted each one of these hyperrealistic pieces by hand. His work combines an astounding technical mastery of his art with an emotional understanding and depiction of his subject.